Going Once…Going Twice…Sold! A Frank Lloyd Wright Home Saved

 Many of you have heard about the looming threat by a Phoenix developer to demolish the David Wright House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Yesterday I learned that the home has been spared the wrecking ball.   It’s been reported that an unnamed buyer who plans on restoring the home to its original slender is currently under contract.  The selling price: $2.4 million!

Photo by Scott Jarson,azarchitecture.com ©2012 Photo courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy

 It’s a hefty price but considering its historical importance and the uniqueness of this particular FLW home, still a wise investment.  You simply shouldn’t delete history!

Photo by Scott Jarson,azarchitecture.com ©2012 Photo courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy

The home holds an abundance of memories for the Wright family. They occupied “Spiral House” until 2008 when David’s widow passed away at the age of 104.  I hope its new owners create a centuries worth of memories to add to this home’s rich past.

Photo by Scott Jarson,azarchitecture.com ©2012 Photo courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy

 The house has a spiral design, with a long curved entry ramp that serves as  a precursor for the famed cylindrical design of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.

Photo by Scott Jarson,azarchitecture.com ©2012 Photo courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy

The iconic rug designed by Wright for the living room has been separated from the house.  It was put up for auction by a previous owner in 2010.  The rug sold for $16,000 much less than it’s estimated value of  $40,000 to $60,000.

Photo by Scott Jarson,azarchitecture.com ©2012 Photo courtesy of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy

A quick Google search lead me to the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy, where I discovered a hoard of information on FLW as well as a list of some Frank Lloyd Wright residences on the market. Below are just a few other Frank Lloyd Wright historical homes being offered for sale.

T r a c y   R e s i d e n c e

Normandy Park, Washington

1955

Nestled among mature trees on a water-front property with views of Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains you will find the Tracy Residence.  The home is an example of Usonian Automatic design consisting of over 1,700 concrete blocks.  The Tracy’s cast the blocks themselves.  Tracy House is called the “Jewel Box”.  I imagine it’s because of the light that literally pierces through and floods the home, reflecting off its tiled floors.  The home is full of rich textures, geometric properties, and wonderfully enchanting details.  The asking price is $949,000.

Tracy Residence Photo courtesy of Larry Woodin, Executor

Tracy Residence Photo courtesy of Larry Woodin, Executor

Tracy Residence Photo courtesy of Larry Woodin, Executor

A n d r e w  &  M a u d e   C o o k e   H o u s e

Virginia Beach, Virginia

1953

As one approaches the Cooke house they’re welcome by a copper cantilevered roof, a sweeping curved 70 foot great room with vaulted ceiling, and large fireplace.  Cooke House is a variation of FLW’s hemicycle style.  Designed in 1953,  construction started in 1959, two weeks before FLW’s death.  The furniture for this home was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, including, my favorite feature, the incredible 40 foot sofa in the great room.  Can you imagine the memorable parties one could throw in this house?  The asking price is $3,750.00.

Cooke House Photo courtesy of Daniel Duhl flwrightbeachhouse.com

Cooke House Photo courtesy of Daniel Duhl flwrightbeachhouse.com

Cooke House Photo courtesy of Daniel Duhl flwrightbeachhouse.com

Cooke House Photo courtesy of Daniel Duhl flwrightbeachhouse.com

Cooke House Photo courtesy of Daniel Duhl flwrightbeachhouse.com

Cooke House Photo courtesy of Daniel Duhl flwrightbeachhouse.com

A.  W.   G r i d l e y   R e s i d e n c e

Batavia, Illinois

1096

Nick named “Ravine House” because of the ravine sloping wildflowers of the south end of the house.  The Gridley Residence is a very good example of Wright’s Prairie School style.  One unique feature of this home is that is has clear glass as opposed to stained glass, because Wright wanted the owners to view the beautiful trees around the property.   And what a property it is!  The home is situated on 2.3 acres of land.  The original plan included a stucco wall surrounding the front  which has been removed and a barn that was never built.  The house is currently under contract.

Gridley Residence Photo courtesy of Linda Mahaney Coldwell Banker Residential

Gridley Residence Photo courtesy of Linda Mahaney Coldwell Banker Residential

Gridley Residence Photo courtesy of Linda Mahaney Coldwell Banker Residential

To find more information about Frank Lloyd Wright and other residences for sale please visit the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy.

Is there a particular Frank Lloyd house you would like to see more of or perhaps own? Let me know.  The comment button is at the top right of this post.

Benji

All photos used by special permission.

An earnest thank you to the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy and the owners, brokers and executors of these unique American treasures, for allowing me to share these photos with you.

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